Paying for College – A Requirement Under the Child Support Standards Act?

Prior to the enactment of the Child Support Standards Act, contained in Family Court Act §413 and Domestic Relations Law §240, the courts had held that the provision of a college education to one’s minor children was not a necessary expense for which a parent could be obligated in the absence of a voluntary agreement or special circumstances. Haessly v. Haessly, 203 A.D.2d 700 (3d Dept. 1994). However, recent case law recognized that special circumstances, which involve the educational background of the parents, the child’s academic ability, and the parents’ financial ability to provide the necessary funds, continue to be relevant factors in applying the standard set forth by the Legislature in the Child Support Standards Act for determining whether an award for college expenses is appropriate.

It is clear that the Court has the power to order a parent to pay his child’s educational costs even though the parties’ settlement agreement is silent on that issue. Manocchio v. Manocchio, 16 A.D.3d 1126 (4th Dept. 2005); McDonald v. McDonald, 262 A.D.2d 1028 (4th Dept. 1999). As aptly noted in Mrowka v. Mrowka, 260 A.D.2d 613, 613 (2d Dept. 1999), “Although the parties’ stipulation of settlement was silent as to the costs of college, this does not necessarily mean that an agreement was reached pursuant to which college costs would not constitute a component of the parties’ obligation to pay child support.”

According to the Appellate Division, Fourth Department, Fruchter v. Fruchter, 288 A.D.2d 942, 943 (4th Dept. 2001), the Child Support Standards Act authorizes an award of educational expenses where warranted by the best interests of the children and as justice requires, upon a showing of “special circumstances”. Relevant factors include the educational background of the parents, the child’s scholastic ability, and the parents’ ability to provide the necessary funds. Id.

In Manocchio v. Manocchio, 16 A.D.3d 1126 (4th Dept. 2005), the Appellate Division, the Fourth Department, rejected the father’s contention that Family Court improperly denied his objection to an order requiring him to pay half of his daughter’s educational expenses. The Fourth Department held that the support magistrate properly determined that the petitioner-mother was unable to meet the child’s educational needs on the income and support that she was receiving, and that the respondent-father had the ability to pay support. Id.

Therefore, even if the parties have a separation agreement that is silent on the issue of paying for college, they may be directed to pay for their child’s college education by the court.

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