Archive for the ‘taxes’ Category

Transmutation of Separate Property into Marital Property

Sunday, March 23rd, 2014

One of the basic theories in equitable distribution and divorce litigation is that of transmutation. Transmutation theory holds that by their actions, the parties are able to modify the status of the property they own from separate property to marital property. Most of the time transmutation occurs when the parties commingle separate property with marital property or place what otherwise be separate property into both parties’ names.  This was demonstrated in Fehring v. Fehring, 58 A.D.3d 1061 (3rd Dept. 2009), where the money received on account of personal injuries by the husband, would be initially classified as his separate property. However, the husband deposited check in brokerage account held and used jointly by the parties. In January 2006, husband used $50,000 from account to purchase real property. The court held that transferring separate property assets into a joint account raises rebutable presumption that funds are marital property subject to equitable distribution and that the husband failed to rebut presumption of marital property given commingling of funds. It held that the lower court providently exercised discretion in distributing equally the value of interest in real property purchased with funds held in joint account.

Another example of how separate property may become a marital asset was addressed in a recent decision from the Appellate Division, Fourth Department. In Foti v. Foti, 2014 N.Y. Slip Op 00835 (4th Dept. 2014), defendant received several pieces of real property as gift from her father. Subsequently, tax losses associated with those properties were taken on the parties’ joint income tax returns. The court held that there was a question of fact whether defendant commingled her interests in the entities with marital property and whether a joint federal tax return in which defendant reported her interest in the entities as tax losses, precluded her from taking “a position contrary to a position taken in an income tax return”.

Unfortunately, the Foti decision does not give us enough facts to find out exactly what the tax returns stated. Nonetheless, this shows that even a seemingly innocuous act of filing a tax return may change the status of the property. In my view, decisions like this one, could have been prevented if the parties had signed either a prenuptial or a postnuptial agreement. If you are contemplating divorce, be careful to avoid taking any action that converts your separate property to marital property. Once transmutation takes place, it is highly unlikely that you would be able to change the property’s status back to separate property, even with a lawyer’s assistance.

Tax Implications in Divorce – Need for Trial Evidence

Sunday, June 5th, 2011

One of the issues that frequently comes up in divorce is cases has to do with tax implications of the divorce action.  Tax issues may involve dependency exemptions, or may involve issues dealing with allocation of taxes on income or assets subject to equitable distribution.  The courts have addressed these issues in the past and have always required some admissible proof with respect to tax implications of the relief sought in the divorce action. However, some parties still fail to present admissible trial evidence that would allow the court to make decisions allocating tax liabilities, if any.

In Bayer v. Bayer, 80 A.D.3d 492 (1st Dept. 2011), the Appellate Division had to address whether the trial court properly disregarded the tax consequences impacting plaintiff’s receipt of fifty percent of monies which defendant had earned in the fiscal quarter preceding commencement of the divorce action.  The Appellate Division held that since defendant failed to present evidence from which the court could determine the amount of such taxes, the trial court acted properly.  The Appellate Division relied upon D’Amico v. D’Amico, 66 A.D.3d 951 (2nd Dept. 2009).  In D’Amico, the court held that “[W]hile this court has recognized that the value of a pension should be discounted by the amount of income tax required to be paid by a party, where the party seeking the discount fails to present any evidence from which the court could have determined the dollar amount of the tax consequences, the computation of the award without regard to tax consequences will be deemed proper”. (citations omitted)

Therefore, if there are tax issues associated with dependency exemptions, maintenance, retirement assets or equitable distribution, in order to have trial court consider those issues , a party must present admissible evidence of any tax consequences that may result. If a party fails to do so, the trial court will not consider any tax implications. As a result, a party seeking the court’s decision with respect to tax issues will have to present expert testimony of an accountant who would be able to present admissible evidence of any tax implications.

Divorce, Separation and Selection of Tax Status for Filing

Saturday, February 27th, 2010

I have previously discussed some of the tax issues related to divorce, maintenance and dependency exemptions.  As the tax season approaches, here is some additional information that may be of assistance.

In a typical divorce, unless the parties have been legally separated prior to December 31, they are still able file a joint return.   By filing a joint return, both spouses will be jointly and separately liable for any errors, omissions or deficiencies on the tax return.   If the parties are going through divorce, the issues related to division of any tax refunds may also become complicated.

If you are legally separated from your spouse, you are able to file as a head of household if you provided more than half the cost of keeping up a home for a child, dependent parent, or other qualifying relative for more than half the year.  According to the IRS, to claim head of household, you must either be unmarried or considered unmarried on the last day of the year.  In addition, the Abandoned Spouse rule may be applicable.   In order to qualify under the rule, if you and your spouse lived apart for the last six months of the year, you would be considered unmarried for the purpose of this filing status under the Abandoned Spouse rule.  If you meet the other two requirements for this status, you would be eligible to file as Head of Household.  The other two requirements are as follows:  1) paying more than half of the cost of keeping up a home as of the last day of the tax year;  2) a dependent child or other relative lived with you for more than half the year or you have a dependent parent (dependent parents are not required to live with you).

A party is required to file as single if he or she was unmarried as of December 31, or if legally separated as of the end of the year and does not qualify for another filing status.

There are other tax advantages and disadvantages that depend on the filing status elected by the party.  Please note that the above discussion is not tax advice, and these issues should be discussed with your tax professional.

Child Support Calculation and Income Tax Refunds

Monday, March 16th, 2009

In general, the Child Support Standards Act includes all of the parties’ income for child support calculations, subject to appropriate child support limits and deductions. What happens in the situation when a party is receiving a tax refund for teh taxes paid during the previous year? In Shelby T. v. Michael L., 2009 NY Slip Op 29075 (Fam. Ct. Clinton Co. 2009), Judge Lawliss overturned the support magistrate’s decision which included the tax refund as income in the child support calculation. The court held that since the party obligated to pay child support receives a tax refund on the taxes paid in 2008, in 2009, if the court were to include the tax refund in the child support calculation, then the money earned, and taxed, in 2008, would count as income for child support purposes once again in 2009. Clearly, that was not the result contemplated by the Child Support Standards Act.

If engaged in child support litigation, a lawyer must make sure that his client’s income is counted only once and that the client receives all applicable deductions and variances.

Tax Issues in Custody and Divorce

Sunday, December 21st, 2008

As we come to the end of the year, I am often asked about different tax issues applicable to my clients’ situations.

If my client’s divorce will not become final before the end of the year, the parties can still file a joint tax return. Once the judgment of divorce has been filed, an ex-spouse can file the return as a head of household, if he or she has paid for over half the maintenance of the household, and has a dependent living at his or her home for over half the year.

When the parties are divorced, only one of them can claim the $3,500 child dependency exemption on their tax returns for 2008. The parent claiming the dependency exemption is also allowed a $1,000-per-child tax credit for children younger than 17, as long as his or her income is not above the following cut-offs. For a married couple filing jointly, it is $110,000, for a married couple filing separately, it is $55,000 per spouse, and for all others, it is $75,000. If the applicable income exceeds the above thresholds, the amount of the child tax credit is reduced proportionately.

Usually, it is the person named as the custodial parent in the child custody portion of the divorce decree that is allowed to claim the child as a dependent. If the divorce decree does not name a custodial parent, then the parent with whom the child has lived with the longest throughout the year is the custodial parent.

A non-custodial parent, however, can claim the child dependency exemption, as long as the custodial parent signs a waiver promising not to claim the exemption. This is typically accomplished by the use of IRS Form 8332. However, the recent amendments of the IRS regulations dealing with this issue have complicated this issue. The final regulations provide that a release not on a Form 8332 must be a document executed for the sole purpose of releasing the claim. A court order or decree or a separation agreement cannot serve as the written declaration. If a release of a claim to a child is for more than one year, the noncustodial parent must attach a copy of the written declaration to the parent’s return for the first tax year for which the release is effective. Copies must also be attached to returns for later years. Under the final regulations, a custodial parent who released the right to claim a child, can revoke the release for future tax years by providing written notice of the revocation to the other parent. The final regulations require that the parent revoking the release notify, or make reasonable attempts to notify, in writing, the other parent of the revocation. What is a reasonable attempt is determined under the facts and circumstances, but mailing a copy of the written revocation to the noncustodial parent at the last known address or at an address reasonably calculated to ensure receipt satisfies this requirement. A revocation can be made on Form 8332, or successor form designated by IRS. A revocation not on the designated form must conform to the substance of the form, and be in a document executed for the sole purpose of revoking a release. A taxpayer revoking a release may attach a copy rather than an original to the taxpayer’s return for the first tax year the revocation is effective, as well as for later years.

Yet another related issue is who can claim the child as dependent under the group health plan coverage and health savings account (“HSA”) distributions. Under the final regulations, for purposes of group health plan coverage and health savings account (HSA) distributions, both parents can claim the child as a dependent if: (1) the child qualifies as a dependent of one of the parents; (2) the parents (both parents together) provide more than ½ of the child’s support for the calendar year; (3) the child is in the custody of one or both parents for more than ½ of the calendar year; and
(4) the parents are divorced, legally separated under a decree of separate maintenance, separated under a written separation agreement, or live apart at all times during the last six (6) months of the calendar year.

If a non-custodial parent claims the child exemption first, and without the custodial parent’s permission, he or she is likely to receive the exemption temporarily. However, once the custodial parent files his or her tax return including the exemption, and IRS notices that a child’s social security number has been included on two different tax returns, then both parties would be notified by IRS that only one party is entitled to the exemption, and the tie-breaker rule would be used to resolve this situation. This rule says that if two parents claim that a child as a dependent, the parent with whom that the child lived with the longest during the year, receives the exemption. If the child had spent the same amount of time with both parents, then the parent that had the higher adjusted gross income would get the exemption. The parent who was not entitled to the exemption would have to repay the tax, plus penalties and interest.

Regardless of who the custodial parent is, if the non-custodial parent pays for any of the child’s medical bills, these costs can be a deduction, subject to appropriate income limits. Child-care credit for work-related expenses can be claimed for children younger than 13.

The spouse who pays maintenance or spousal support can also receive a tax deduction for these payments, even if they aren’t itemized—as long as the payment amounts are stated in the divorce agreement or the judgment of divorce, and actually paid. The spouse who receives maintenance must pay taxes on it. For child support, however, there is no deduction for paying it and no taxes are paid by the parent receiving it. Assets transferred from one spouse to another during a divorce are not generally taxed.

Please note that the above discussion is not a tax advice and these issues should be discussed with your tax professional.