Credit for Payments Made to Satisfy the Other Spouse’s Legal Obligations

It is common for parties to make payments on their debts while their divorce action is pending.  Generally, each party is responsible for their own debts incurred after commencement of the divorce action, and, most of the time, the parties are jointly liable on any marital debt that preceded commencement of the divorce action. However, there are situations where one party is forced to make payment for the debts owed by the other party. Thus, it is important to know if one spouse pays for the other spouse’s legal obligations, does that spouse receive a credit for those payments?

In McKay v. Groesbeck, 117 AD3d 810 (N.Y.A.D. 2 Dept. 2014), the Appellate Division pointed out that a party’s maintenance and child support obligations are retroactive to the earlier of the date of filing or the date of application for them. Further, any retroactive amount due has to be paid, as the court directs, taking into account any amount of temporary maintenance or child support which has been paid as provided by DRL §236[B][6][a] and DRL § 236[B][7][a].

Generally, voluntary payments made by a parent for the benefit of his or her children may not be credited against amounts due under the court order or a judgment of divorce.  Only payments made pursuant to the judgment or order can be credited. Also, a party is not entitled to a credit for payments made to satisfy that party’s own legal obligations that were not made pursuant to a pendente lite order of support.

In McKay, there was a pendente lite order for temporary child support of $1,000 per month issued in 2006, but no payments were made pursuant to that order. However, a party is entitled to a credit for payments made to satisfy the other spouse’s legal obligations. The court held that the defendant should have received a credit towards arrears for any payments he made toward the plaintiff’s car payments and insurance, and for one half of the payments he made toward the mortgage and carrying charges on the marital home, as those payments were made to satisfy the plaintiff’s legal obligations.

Thus, the party paying legal obligations will receive a credit for those payments. This situation is likely to occur where the party receiving child support and/or spousal maintenance does not have sufficient financial resources to satisfy all of his or her debts. If the court grants this credit, both parties may benefit.

Overpayment of Pendente Lite Maintenance and Equitable Distribution

I have previously written that the Supreme Court has wide latitude in fashioning pendente lite (interim) maintenance awards while the divorce action is pending.  But what happens if the trial court ultimately decides that the pendente lite maintenance award was excessive?  The Court of Appeals recently addressed this issues in Johnson v. Chapin, 2009N.Y.  Slip. Op. 03630 (2009).

In Johnson, the Court of Appeals held that when a pendente lite award of maintenance is found at trial to be excessive or inequitable, the court may make an appropriate adjustment in the equitable distribution award.  Thus, the Court of Appeals held that the trial court did not abuse its discretion in giving husband a credit representing the amount of the pendente lite maintenance he paid that exceeded what he was required to pay under the final maintenance award.  In determining the temporary maintenance award, Supreme Court imputed an average salary in excess of $2 million to husband. However, at trial, it was established that his income was significantly lower. Given the disparity in the maintenance amounts, under the circumstances of this case, it was appropriate for the husband to receive a credit for excessive maintenance paid.

This decision is significant since it reaffirms the principle that pendente lite awards are temporary and are subject to adjustment.  An experienced divorce lawyer will not rest after obtaining a favorable pendente lite relief for the client, but will continue to work to make sure that the any pendente lite maintenance, or other interim award, is preserved as a part of a final decision.

Payments on Pre-Marital Debt and Right of Recoupment – Update

I have previously written about the case of Mahoney-Buntzman v. Mahoney, 51 A.D.3d 732 (2nd Dept. 2008), which stood for the proposition that that marital property used to pay one spouse’s obligations incurred either prior to the marriage, or benefitting only one spouse, could be recouped.  In Mahoney-Buntzman, the Appellate Division held that the husband’s maintenance obligation to his first wife and the boat loan constituted debts incurred by him prior to the parties’ marriage and were solely his responsibility. Accordingly, the court granted to the wife a credit for one half of the payments made.

Last week, the Court of Appeals issued its decision in Mahoney-Buntzman v. Mahoney, __ N.Y.2d __, 2009 N.Y. Slip. Op. 03629 (2009), and reversed the Appellate Division holding that that marital property used to pay maintenance and child support to the husband’s wife from a previous marriage should not be recouped to the marital estate.  The opinion used very broad language which is likely to eliminate any kind of recoupment of marital money expended for separate property purposes.  Specifically, the Court of Appeals held that:

[D]uring the life of any marriage, many payments are made, whether of debts old or new, or simply current expenses. If courts were to consider financial activities that occur and end during the course of a marriage, the result would be parties to a marriage seeking review of every debit and credit incurred. As a general rule, where the payments are made before either party is anticipating the end of the marriage, and there is no fraud or concealment, courts should not look back and try to compensate for the fact that the net effect of the payments may, in some cases, have resulted in the reduction of marital assets. Nor should courts attempt to adjust for the fact that payments out of separate property may have benefitted both parties, or even the non-titled spouse exclusively. The parties’ choice of how to spend funds during the course of the marriage should ordinarily be respected. Courts should not second-guess the economic decisions made during the course of a marriage, but rather should equitably distribute the assets and obligations remaining once the relationship is at an end.

Expenditures made during the life of the marriage towards maintenance to a former spouse, as well as payments made pursuant to a child support order, are obligations that do not enure solely to the benefit of one spouse. Payments made to a former spouse and/or children of an earlier marriage, even if made pursuant to court order, are not the type of liabilities entitled to recoupment.

This is not to say that every expenditure of marital funds during the course of the marriage may not be considered in an equitable distribution calculation. Domestic Relations Law § 236(B)(5)(d)(13) expressly and broadly authorizes the trial court to take into account “any other factor which the court shall expressly find to be just and proper” in determining an equitable distribution of marital property. There may be circumstances where equity requires a credit to one spouse for marital property used to pay off the separate debt of one spouse or add to the value of one spouse’s separate property (see e.g. Micha v Micha, 213 AD2d 956, 957-958 [3d Dept 1995]; Carney v Carney, 202 AD2d 907[3d Dept 1994]). Further, to the extent that expenditures are truly excessive, the ability of one party to claim that the other has accomplished a “wasteful dissipation of assets” (DRL 236 [B][5][d][11]) by his or her expenditures provides protection. The payment of maintenance to a former spouse, however, does not fall under either of these categories.

Thus, it is unlikely that any recoupment will be allowed by the courts in the future.  This decision makes it even more important that each marital estate is carefully scrutinized by an experienced divorce lawyer to establish the respective rights and obligations of the parties.

Overpayment of Child Support and Right of Recoupment

Periodically, I am asked about situations where an overpayment of child support has taken place. Most of the time in those situations, I, as a lawyer, have to deliver to the client the unpleasant news that the amount overpaid cannot be recovered. This is true whether the child support was being paid pusuant to a judgment of divorce, separation agreement, or an order of Family Court. With respect to child support, there is a strong public policy against restitution or recoupment of any overpayment. See Katz v. Katz, 55 A.D.3d 680 (2nd Dept. 2008). The strong public policy considerations as decided by the New York courts, prevent recoupment or refund of child support paid. However, a parent may be entitled to a credit, enabling him or her to re-coup the overpayment of the child support payments against his/her share of the statutory add-on expenses – the portion of child support intended to cover child care and a child’s educational and special needs. See Coull v. Rottman, 35 AD3d 198 (1st Dept. 2007).

There are also certain limited circumstances in which a refund of child support may take place. For example, a refund may be directed when there was a mathematical error in the calculation of the amount of support (Colicci v. Ruhm, 20 AD3d 891 (4th Dept. 2005); when the support amount in the final order of support is less than in the temporary award (Maksimyadis v. Maksimyadis, 275 AD2d 459 (1st Dept. 2000)); or when it is shown that the subject child is not the biological child of the payor and there is no finding of estoppel (Thomas v. Commissioner of Social Services, 287 AD2d 642 (2nd Dept. 2001). There may be another category of cases where a refund of child support may be ordered. In Spencer v. Spencer, previously discussed on this blog, the Court of Appeals hinted that the recoupment may be available where it is ultimately determined that New York court lacked jurisdiction to order payment of child support.

If you are in a situation where you believe that child support was or is being overpaid, speak with an experienced family law attorney and find out what your options are and what can done in your particular case.