Sperm Donation, Paternity, and What Not to Do

Generally, a sperm donor is not treated as a father under New York law. However, a typical sperm bank will have prospective mother sign a contract that will disclaim any liability for the donor. A recent case has demonstrated that a donor who chooses to make a private sperm donation without an agreement in place, may expose himself to unexpected consequences.

In Matter of Claudia B. v Darrin M., the Appellate Division, First Department, held that a private sperm donor can be treated as a parent. After the parties’ relationship ended, the petitioner asked the respondent to donate sperm so she could conceive. He agreed. When the respondent donated 17 vials of semen to a fertility center, the parties were still negotiating an agreement providing that he would have no parental rights or responsibilities. No binding agreement was ever reached and executed.

The respondent moved to dismiss the petition on equitable estoppel grounds arguing that the parties intended that he be a sperm donor only, without any legal rights or obligations to the child. The lower court denied the motion and ordered him to submit to DNA testing; and, subsequently, declared him to be the biological father of the child. The First Department affirmed stating:

Respondent’s estoppel claim rests on the premise that the parties had a binding preconception agreement. Contrary to respondent’s contention, there was no binding enforceable oral or written agreement between the parties, either before or after respondent donated his sperm. There is no dispute that a signed contract does not exist. Nor was any final oral agreement reached.

This case makes it clear that trying to do certain things without an attorney familiar with New York’s Family Law, is risky, and can create a life-long financial responsibility. As a result of lacking understanding of legal issues involved, respondent became a legal father of the child without intending to do so. Respondent will be responsible for child support, portion of health insurance and child care costs, and potentially college costs as well, until the child reaches the age of emancipation, which in New York, is 21 in most circumstances.